Woodturning as an artform has seen a veritable explosion of interest in the last 10-20 years. The result has been spectacular both in terms of the quality of work and in the number of woodturners, both professional and amateur, who now spin wood with creative intent.

The field of woodturning has been defined again and again over the years by fresh (and some not so fresh) faces, people who explored new techniques, developed new skills, and created spectacular artwork that we only dared to imagine 20 years ago.

While there is only a bucketful of true innovators, turners working at my level are a dime a dozen. To find a unique niche in this field isn't easy. In addition to producing this web site to showcase my art, I have done it to help define my niche and my style. Now I can look at these pages and say, "So that's what I'm all about!"

I am often asked where my design ideas come from. There is, of course, in the minds of all artists a Room of Creative Design, occupied by creative gnomes of various predilections. At the center of the room is a table with a large drawing pad. The gnomes, when you can actually get them to sit down and work, will reason and argue and scribble until they have put together "The Picture."

I have at least four prominent gnomes and a host of minor, sometimes annoying, gnomelets. One gnome, "Bubba", is a traditional, blue-collar gnome who directs the shapes of most of my vessels. The shapes, like the gnome, are really quite simple. "Buddha," another gnome, adds an oriental touch to many of my designs. The third prominent gnome, "Bud," is somewhat of a biologist who is taken with the structural pattern of flowers and the microscopic anatomy of plankton. And the fourth gnome is more of a demon who draws from my inner conflicts to add a bit of an edge to some of the designs. "Bud" teams up with the demon to produce lots of pointy things--thorns, teeth, and so on.

And you thought it would be difficult to explain where designs come from.

Pity the gnomeless.

But remember two things: First, you must encourage and pamper your gnomes. And Second, there has never been a gnomeless woodturner.

My background includes a PhD in zoology (University of Wisconsin, 1978), followed by a stint teaching woodworking in a recreational program at the University of Michigan. It was in the early 1980's at the University of Michigan that I taught myself how to turn wood. I added it to my woodworking repertoire, and it pretty much took over. Ever since, I have been a semi-serious, part-time woodturner. I do a few art shows each year, making enough money to support a creative drive and a wood-buying habit. My shop is a garage in Gainesville, Florida. I have had stay-at-home parental duties for the past 14 years, and now homeschool my kid (thus the part-time status).

Now you know the artist.









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